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Small quake hits in dangerous fault zone in SF Bay Area

A view of the Golden Gate Bridge is pictured from Berkeley, Calif., where a small earthquake was recorded Tuesday along one of the most dangerous fault zones in the United States. File Photo by Terry Schmitt/UPI
A view of the Golden Gate Bridge is pictured from Berkeley, Calif., where a small earthquake was recorded Tuesday along one of the most dangerous fault zones in the United States. File Photo by Terry Schmitt/UPI | License Photo

June 9 (UPI) -- A small earthquake shook the San Francisco Bay Area on Tuesday, where residents reported slight shaking but no injuries or damage.

The magnitude-2.7 quake was recorded at the University of California, Berkeley, at a depth of six miles near the edge of campus, the U.S. Geological Survey said.

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Berkeley is about 4 miles north of Oakland, Calif., and 10 miles northeast of San Francisco across the Bay Bridge.

Part of the university, near California Memorial Stadium, sits along the Hayward Fault, which is an active seismic line that has produced many small earthquakes but no major events in more than 150 years. The most recent major quake along the fault zone occurred in 1868.

Scientists say chances of a major quake in the Hayward zone is increasing due to the length of time that's passed since the last significant event.

The fault, which stretches from San Pablo Bay to the San Jose area, is considered by geologists one of the most dangerous in the United States due to the proximity of its local population and structures.

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