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Sen. Lamar Alexander self-quarantines after possible COVID-19 exposure

Chairman Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., wears a plaid face mask before a Senate Health Education Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on new coronavirus tests on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. Pool Photo by Andrew Harnik/UPI
Chairman Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., wears a plaid face mask before a Senate Health Education Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on new coronavirus tests on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. Pool Photo by Andrew Harnik/UPI | License Photo

May 11 (UPI) -- Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Texas, will self-quarantine after a member of his staff tested positive for the coronavirus.

Alexander's chief of staff David Cleary made the announcement Sunday in a statement, saying the senator was doing well and had tested negative for the infectious and deadly virus on Thursday.

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"Sen. Alexander has no symptoms and tested negative for COVID-19 on Thursday afternoon, May 7," Clearly said. "After discussing this with the Senate's attending physician, Sen. Alexander, out of an abundance of caution, has decided not to return to Washington, D.C., and will self-quarantine in Tennessee for 14 days."

The Republican senator will work remotely, Cleary said, adding, most of his Washington, D.C., staff have been working from home and will not be required to self-quarantine.

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The aide had tested positive for the virus Sunday, he said.

Alexander is the latest politician to self-quarantine after having come into contact or close proximity to a possible infected person.

Five Republicans, including President Donald Trump's Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, quarantined themselves after having come into contact with a guest who tested positive for the virus in late February during the Conservative Political Action Conference.

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In March, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., announced he had tested positive for the coronavirus becoming the first U.S. politician to do so.

Utah Republican Sens. Mitt Romney and Mike Lee entered self-quarantine after Paul's announcement as they had come into contact with Kentucky senator.

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Over the weekend, three other members of the White House's coronavirus task force self-quarantined due to possible exposure to an aide who tested positive for the virus.

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