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Gallup: Most Americans wouldn't vote for a 'socialist'

Gallup: Most Americans wouldn't vote for a 'socialist'
Nashua, New Hampshire, residents cast their votes on Tuesday, February 11, 2020. A new Gallup poll found that Americans Photo by Matthew Healey/UPI | License Photo

Feb. 11 (UPI) -- Fewer than 50 percent of Americans said they would vote for a socialist as president, a new Gallup survey released Tuesday said.

The poll, taken from Jan. 16-29, measured respondents' attitudes toward voting for "well-qualified" candidates from different races, ethnicities, religions, and sexual preferences along with being a socialist.

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Only 45 percent of respondents said they would vote for a socialist as president.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., one of the leading Democratic presidential candidates, has regularly described himself as a "Democratic Socialist."

RELATED Poll: 90% of small business owners in U.S. engaged in 2020 race

President Donald Trump has spoken against socialism.

"Here, in the United States, we are alarmed by new calls to adopt socialism in our country," Trump said in his State of the Union speech this month. "Tonight, we renew our resolve that America will never be a socialist country."

Atheists received the second-lowest mark from voters, with 60 percent of voters saying they would vote for someone identifying themselves as such for president.

RELATED Poll: More Americans favor Democrats over Trump to drive U.S.

Two other categories received less than 70 percent of "yes" votes from respondents. Only 66 percent of respondents said they would vote for a Muslim and 69 percent said they would vote for someone older than 70.

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Trump was 70 when he was elected president and is now 73, former Vice President Joe Biden, one of the leading Democratic candidates, is now 77 and Sanders is 78.

Seventy-eight percent of respondents said they would vote for someone from the LGBT community. Pete Buttigieg, another leading Democratic candidate, is openly gay.

Some attitudes about voting preferences have changed over time. In 1958, only 38 percent in the Gallup poll said they would vote for an African-American. In 2007, a year before Barack Obama was elected president, 94 percent said they would vote for a black candidate.

Survey respondents said they were most open to "well-qualified" black candidates (96 percent), Catholics (95 percent), Hispanics (94 percent), Jews (93 percent) and women (93 percent). Eighty percent of respondents said they would vote for and evangelical Christian as president.

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