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Google observes 60th anniversary of Greensboro sit-in with Doodle

Google observes 60th anniversary of Greensboro sit-in with Doodle
Google displayed this new Doodle Saturday honoring the Greensboro sit-in 60 years ago. Image courtesy of Google.

Feb. 1 (UPI) -- In honor of Black History Month, Google remembered the Greensboro Four sit-in protest with a new Doodle on Saturday.

The Doodle depicts the four black college freshmen who on the same date in 1960 met at a Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, N.C., to protest segregation through a sit-in demonstration.

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The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. inspired N.C. A&T State University students Ezell Blair Jr., also known as Jibreel Khazan, David Richmond, Franklin McCain and Joseph McNeil, who became known collectively as the Greensboro Four.

The non-violent demonstration for racial equality at the whites-only lunch counter began with the four sitting down and waiting despite repeated requests for them to leave. They came back the next day and to do the same thing.

By the third day, more than 300 students joined the Greensboro sit-in protest.

It was seen as a pivotal part of the Civil Rights Movement, sparking similar protests across the segregated South.

Karen Collins, founder of the African American Miniature Museum, created the Doodle from a photo of a diorama.

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The exhibit tells stories of black history through dioramas in shadow boxes, which she and her husband, Eddie Lewis, created, according to a blog post.

"Today's Doodle not only pays homage to the sit-in, but also everything that came as a result: changes in our country to make it more possible for ALL Americans - - no matter their race, color, or creed -- to live to their full potential," she wrote.

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