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House sends Senate stopgap bill to avert government shutdown

By
Darryl Coote
The House passed the spending measure just a few days before government funding is set to run out. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI
The House passed the spending measure just a few days before government funding is set to run out. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Nov. 20 (UPI) -- The House passed a short-term spending bill late Tuesday in an effort to avoid a federal shutdown, as government funds are set to run out this week.

The stopgap measure, or continuing resolution, passed 231-192 to keep money in government coffers until Dec. 20. It will now head to the Senate and, if the upper chamber approves, then to President Donald Trump. Government funds will run out at midnight Thursday.

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"I am pleased that we are keeping government open, assuring full funding for a fair and accurate Census and ensuring a pay raise for our military," House appropriations committee Chairwoman Nita M. Lowey said. "Even with passage of this CR, American families, businesses and communities need the certainty of full-year funding.

"Only by coming together in good faith can we settle subcommittee allocations and enact responsible, full-year spending bills that invest in critical priorities."

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The continuing resolution would ensure the Census Bureau full funding for the 2020 Census, a 3.1 percent pay raise for uniformed services, an increase in funding for the Indian Health Service and an increase of funds to respond to the Ebola outbreak in Africa.

Trump signed the present stopgap funding measure in late September.

The temporary measure follows unsuccessful talks for a longer-term deal. Although Congress has approved much of what would be a two-year budget deal, issues remain over border security and defense funding.

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The longest federal shutdown in U.S. history ended in January after 35 days, following political differences over Trump's plan to build a new wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

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