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Sen. Elizabeth Warren plans to pass Medicare for All plan by third year

By Danielle Haynes
Sen. Elizabeth Warren plans to pass Medicare for All plan by third year
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., said her Medicare for All plan wouldn't tax the middle class. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Nov. 15 (UPI) -- Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren announced Friday she plans to ease Americans into her Medicare for All plan, passing legislation by the third year of her administration.

If she wins the 2020 election, the senator from Massachusetts said she wants to fast-track bills and sign executive orders expanding the Affordable Care Act within her first 100 days in office. The legislation, she said, will pave the way for tens of millions of people to get health insurance coverage "at little or no cost."

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"And at each step of my plan, millions more Americans will pay less for healthcare. Millions more Americans will see the quality of their current health coverage improve. And millions more Americans will have the choice to ditch their private insurance and enter a high-quality public plan," Warren wrote in a Medium post announcing the timeline.

"And, at each step, the changes in our healthcare system will be fully paid for without raising taxes one penny on middle class families."

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Warren revealed details about her Medicare for All plan earlier this month, promising not to further tax the middle class for the program. Her plan would cost just under $52 trillion over 10 years and would cover 331 million people.

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She would also redirect funds from states to help fund the federal Medicare program.

This differs from fellow 2020 Democratic candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., who said raising taxes on the middle class is necessary to pay for Medicare.

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Warren said her plan would allow patients to see the doctors they want to see with no restrictive provider networks, no more insurance companies denying coverage for prescribed treatments and no more going broke over medical bills.

Nicholas Sakelaris contributed to this report.

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