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Poll: More in U.S. enthusiastic about voting in 2020

By
Clyde Hughes
A delegate raises the American flag at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, on July 18, 2016. File Photo by Pete Marovich/UPI
A delegate raises the American flag at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, on July 18, 2016. File Photo by Pete Marovich/UPI | License Photo

Nov. 7 (UPI) -- Enthusiasm among U.S. voters for next year's presidential election is at a high level -- defying a trend that traditionally shows a lack of excitement for the political process at this stage of the campaign, a survey showed Thursday.

Gallup said its poll found 64 percent of respondents said they are "more enthusiastic" than normal about voting in 2020 -- compared to 28 percent who said they are less excited to cast a ballot.

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The last poll that showed greater enthusiasm was taken during the 2008 campaign, when Democrat Barack Obama ran against Republican John McCain.

The research also shows a departure among voters of the party that occupies the White House. Traditionally, the incumbent party is less enthusiastic to vote, and the opposition party more passionate. In Gallup's survey, 66 percent of Republicans and 65 percent of Democrats said they're more enthusiastic to vote this time.

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"On average, 52 percent of Americans have reported being more enthusiastic about voting when asked six months or more ahead of a presidential election," the Gallup report said.

"2020 may set a new standard for voting enthusiasm."

A CNN poll last month showed 88 percent of registered voters said they're enthused -- 47 percent of whom said they're "extremely" excited.

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The last time Gallup saw similar enthusiasm between both parties at this state of the campaign was 2004, when Democrat John Kerry challenged President George W. Bush amid a highly divided U.S. population over the war in Iraq.

Gallup polled more than 1,500 U.S. adults for the survey, which has a margin of error of 3 points.

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