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Survey: 'Extreme' American pride hits new low in U.S.

By Sommer Brokaw
Survey: 'Extreme' American pride hits new low in U.S.
U.S. servicemen and women unfurl a 100-foot American flag during Memorial Day ceremonies at the Intrepid Sea Air & Space Museum in New York City on May 27. File Photo by Peter Foley/UPI | License Photo

July 2 (UPI) -- Ahead of the Fourth of July, new research shows that the number of citizens extremely proud to be American has hit a new low.

Pollster Gallup said Tuesday the survey shows 70 percent of U.S. adults are proud to be Americans -- but only 45 percent said they're "extremely" proud. The latter is the lowest point since Gallup first asked the question in 2001.

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The annual study is the second straight in which a minority of respondents said they're "extremely" proud. Forty-seven percent answered that way a year ago.

The highest points of American pride were seen in the three years following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks -- but the number has since waned.

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The greatest pride varied along partisan lines. Twenty-two percent of Democrats, a low for the survey, said they're extremely proud compared to 41 percent of Independents and 76 percent of Republicans.

Republicans pride (76 percent), however, is still a ways off the record high of 86 percent in 2003.

Gallup also explored pride in eight aspects of U.S. government and society. Most expressed pride in six of eight -- scientific achievements, the military, culture and arts, economic achievements, sporting achievements and diversity in race, ethnic background and religion. Most were not proud of the last two -- health and welfare and politics.

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"The good news is that despite a slump in overall pride, the country offers many achievements that are a source of pride for Americans - - Democrats and Republicans alike," Gallup research consultant Megan Brenan noted.

Gallup interviewed 1,015 adults and the survey has a margin of error of 4 points.

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