Advertisement

Corruption case to be dropped if former Rep. Schock repays IRS

By Danielle Haynes
Corruption case to be dropped if former Rep. Schock repays IRS
Former Rep. Aaron Schock's campaign pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge, but all individual charges against the former lawmaker will be dropped. File Photo by Brian Kersey/UPI | License Photo

March 6 (UPI) -- Federal prosecutors in Chicago agreed to drop a corruption case against former Rep. Aaron Schock if he agrees to pay back money he owes to the Internal Revenue Service and his campaign.

As part of the deal, his campaign, Schock for Congress, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor of inadequately keeping paperwork. All charges against Schock as an individual were dropped.

Advertisement

A grand jury indicted Schock on 24 felony counts in November 2016, including wire fraud, theft of government funds, making false statements and filing false tax returns.

He came under suspicion after public criticisms about an extravagant remodeling of his public office space. His critics began calling him the "Downton Abbey congressman" due to to his office's aesthetic resemblance to the popular television drama.

RELATED Adidas officials, agent sentenced in NCAA basketball corruption trial

Schock repaid the government $40,000 for the redecoration.

The Illinois Republican also became known for showing off his first-class tastes -- posting numerous photographs on social media depicting his world travels, spending hours in the gym and showing off his costly attire.

Schock resigned from office in March 2015 amid the questions about his use of taxpayer dollars.

Advertisement
RELATED Lawmakers demand documents from White House for Trump investigation

He also came under fire for allegedly violating ethics rules. In 2012, the House ethics committee investigated him for a $25,000 donation to his Super PAC from a political action committee controlled by then-House Republican leader Eric Cantor of Virginia.

The Federal Election Commission questioned whether Schock violated rules barring elected officials from soliciting more than $5,000 for Super PACs.

Under the agreement, Schock must repay $42,000 to the IRS and $68,000 to his campaign fund in order for all charges to be dropped.

RELATED Canadian PM Trudeau denies wrongdoing in corruption case

RELATED Ethics watchdog declines to certify Wilbur Ross disclosure report

Latest Headlines

Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us

Advertisement