Advertisement

Progressive group launches ads in key voting states to block Kavanaugh

By
Susan McFarland
Charlie Wood, a child born with pre-existing health conditions, attends a press conference on Capitol Hill Wednesday by Senate Democrats who oppose the appointment of judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI
Charlie Wood, a child born with pre-existing health conditions, attends a press conference on Capitol Hill Wednesday by Senate Democrats who oppose the appointment of judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

July 13 (UPI) -- Progressive group Demand Justice is turning up pressure on Senate Democrats to vote against Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump's second appointee to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The first round of the group's new advertising campaign began Friday in states where Democratic senators hold key votes in blocking Kavanaugh's confirmation. Among them are Sens. Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Joe Donnelly of Indiana.

Advertisement

The three senators, who are up for re-election this fall, represent states Trump won in the 2016 election. All three are considered must-have votes for Democrats to block Kavanaugh, as they voted last year for Trump's first Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch.

Demand Justice, using a portion of its $5 million budget on the ads, said "courts are supposed to be the place that protects the rights of all Americans, but Trump is now stacking them with people loyal to him and his agenda."

RELATED Kavanaugh visits Senate as Democrats lay out bid to block

The group is mounting the campaign because it feels Senate Democrats may not be sufficiently motivated for a fight.

"How are Democrats in Washington responding? Not very courageously," the group posted on its website. "A majority of Democratic senators have voted for more than half of Trump's judges."

An Indiana version of the ads, obtained by NBC News, said: "Thanks to Senator Donnelly, more than 2.7 million Hoosiers with pre-existing conditions still have access to affordable healthcare. But those protections are at risk again, this time in the courts. Kavanaugh refused to uphold key patient protections in the past, and if he joins the court he could vote to end these protections for good."

RELATED Donald Trump nominates Brett Kavanaugh to Supreme Court

A tweet by the group called Kavanaugh "anti-abortion" and "anti-healthcare" and said Trump thinks he is "above the law."

In order to successfully block Kavanaugh, all 49 Democrats would need to vote against him, and probably two Republicans. This week, Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer laid out the party's plan to torpedo the nomination, denoted by the social media tag #WhatsAtStake.

A survey this week by Rasmussen Reports found 83 percent of U.S. voters believe Kavanaugh is likely to be confirmed by the Senate -- with 47 percent saying it's very likely. Eight percent said it's "not very" or "not at all" likely.

RELATED Trump ready to make second Supreme Court pick in 15 months

Latest Headlines