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Oregon first state to enact gun restrictions since Florida attack

By Sara Shayanian
Oregon became the first state to enact new gun restrictions since the deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., last month. File Photo by Gary Rothstein/UPI | <a href="/News_Photos/lp/f265f7b009f9892ddb07619b54ef27b0/" target="_blank">License Photo</a>
Oregon became the first state to enact new gun restrictions since the deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., last month. File Photo by Gary Rothstein/UPI | License Photo

March 6 (UPI) -- Oregon is the first state in the nation to ratify new gun control legislation following the shooting at a Florida high school last month that killed 17.

Gov. Kate Brown signed the state's new law Monday night. It extends bans on firearm ownership to people convicted of domestic violence, even if the victim isn't a spouse, closing the so-called "boyfriend loophole."

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The Legislature passed the measure Feb. 23.

"I couldn't be more proud to sign #HB4145 into law today," Brown tweeted Tuesday. "It's clear gun violence is an epidemic that's tearing our communities apart, but I'm hopeful the tide is turning on our nation's gun debate, and that we now have the chance to enact meaningful change."

Oregon's bill is the first of any state to tighten firearm regulations since the Feb. 14 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., that killed 14 students and three educators.

"We know we have more to do. It's long past time we hold the White House and Congress accountable," Brown said in a statement.

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In Florida on Monday, the state Senate approved a school safety bill to place new restrictions on rifle sales -- and would allow some school staff members to carry firearms.

The measure now goes to the Florida House.

The Florida bill would raise the age limit for gun purchases from 18 to 21, expand a three-day waiting period on handguns to include all rifles and shotguns and ban "bump stocks."

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