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Job creation in August falls to 156,000, lower than 2017 average

By Ed Adamczyk
A mining operation in Pond Fork, W. Va. Mining was among the economic sectors that gained jobs in August, the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday. The overall unemployment rate in the United States rose from 4.3 percent to 4.4 percent. File Photo by Debbie Hill/UPI | <a href="/News_Photos/lp/2a61d7deeb7c35712c2270c16738b97c/" target="_blank">License Photo</a>
A mining operation in Pond Fork, W. Va. Mining was among the economic sectors that gained jobs in August, the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday. The overall unemployment rate in the United States rose from 4.3 percent to 4.4 percent. File Photo by Debbie Hill/UPI | License Photo

Sept. 1 (UPI) -- The U.S. economy added 156,000 jobs in August, the Labor Department reported Friday, less than the year's monthly average of 184,000 new jobs.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics summary said the unemployment rate rose in August to 4.4 percent, from the previous 4.3 percent. The rate has been at either of those figures since April.

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The bureau added that 7.1 million Americans are currently unemployed.

Other reported data show little change in the employment picture since July's figures. The unemployment figure in August among men was 4.1 percent; women, 4.0 percent; teenagers, 13.6 percent; white Americans, 3.9 percent; African-Americans, 7.7 percent; Asian-Americans, 4.0 percent and Hispanic-Americans, 5.2 percent. These figures are essentially the same as those of July.

Employment in the fields of construction, professional and trade services, mining and health care each rose in August, continuing a five-month trend.

Wage growth slowed in August, the statistics show. Average hourly earnings for non-farm payrolls rose three cents, to $26.39 per hour. That average rose nine cents in July.

The report noted that August's survey data collection was completed before Hurricane Harvey struck the Gulf Coast. Next month's statistics will likely be impacted by the effects of the storm.

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