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Two soldiers die in helicopter crash near Houston

Officials said they had located the two soldiers' bodies, but had not yet been able to recover them.

By
Stephen Feller
An Apache helicopter, such as the one pictured, crashed into Galveston Bay Wednesday afternoon during a routine training mission, killing two soldiers aboard the aircraft, according to the Texas Army National Guard. Photo by Spc. Scott Lindham/U.S. Army
An Apache helicopter, such as the one pictured, crashed into Galveston Bay Wednesday afternoon during a routine training mission, killing two soldiers aboard the aircraft, according to the Texas Army National Guard. Photo by Spc. Scott Lindham/U.S. Army

LA PORTE, Texas, Dec. 29 (UPI) -- Officials are launching an investigation into what caused an Apache attack helicopter to crash in Galveston Bay Wednesday afternoon, killing both soldiers aboard it.

Two soldiers were killed Wednesday when an AH-64 Apache helicopter flying from Ellington Field went down in the bay, about 24 miles from Houston. A search was launched immediately for the two soldiers, whose bodies have not yet been recovered from the crash.

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"It is with our deepest sympathy we tell you both service members on board the aircraft are deceased," Glen Webb, Chief Warrant Officer with the Texas Army National Guard, said at a press conference. "Our thoughts and prayers are with their family."

The soldiers were on a routine training mission flying the helicopter, which is part of the 1-149th attack helicopter battalion of the Texas Army National Guard.

Although the two men, who were not identified because their families had not yet been contacted, have been located, the national guard said they have not been able to recover their bodies yet.

An investigation was launched into the cause of the crash, but officials did not say whether a black box or other wreckage had been recovered or provide any other information about the helicopter.

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"Since we do not know the cause of the accident, we can't speculate on anything like that," said Master Sgt. Sean Cowher of the Texas Air National Guard. "All we know is our pilots are highly trained, highly qualified veterans that have been flying this aircraft for many years."

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