Advertisement

Colorado ends presidential caucuses in favor of primaries

In 2020 all Colorado voters will be eligible to vote in presidential primaries, even if not affiliated with a party.

By Ed Adamczyk
Colorado ends presidential caucuses in favor of primaries
Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper of Colorado addresses delegates at the 2016 Democratic National Convention. Tuesday he signed bills changing his state's presidential primary procedures, allowing unaffiliated voters to partricipate in party primaries. Photo by Pat Benic/UPI | License Photo

DENVER, Dec. 28 (UPI) -- Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper signed two measures to allow voters to choose presidential nominees through a primary, and not caucus, process.

Each measure was approved by voters in November referenda by margins of two-to-one. Proposition 108 allows all voters to participate in party primaries, even if they are not affiliated with parties. Colorado voters, since 2004, were required to identify themselves as Democrats or Republicans in order to participate in presidential primaries. Proposition 107 eliminates the state's caucus procedures. Hickenlooper, a Democrat, signed both on Tuesday.

Advertisement

Se. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., won Colorado's Democratic caucuses in 2016. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, won the most delegates in Republican Party district conventions, held instead of precinct-level caucuses.

It is anticipated the expanded primary procedures will increase the cost of elections in Colorado, and local and state governments will pay for them. The state estimates the 2020 presidential primaries will cost it $2.7 million, and counties are expected to spend an estimated $5.3 million.

Latest Headlines

Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us

Advertisement