Advertisement

Sinkhole opens, drops radioactive water into Florida aquifer

By Shawn Price
Sinkhole opens, drops radioactive water into Florida aquifer
A giant sinkhole has opened near a fertilizer company in Florida, leading to the spill of more than 200 million gallons of radioactive water in the Florida aquifer that provide drinking water to millions of people. Screen shot: WFTS TV

MULBERRY, Fla., Sept. 19 (UPI) -- A massive sinkhole has opened at a fertilizer plant in Florida, dropping millions of gallons of radioactive water into the Florida aquifer, threatening drinking water and recreational areas nearby.

About 215 million gallons of radioactive water have spilled in to the sinkhole in Mulberry, which fertilizer company Mosaic said is about 45-feet wide and 800-feet deep.

Advertisement

The aquifer is the source of drinking water for millions of local residents and empties into springs that Floridians use for recreation, WFTS reports.

Phosphogypsum is a fertilizer waste product and typically stores in stacks. The sinkhole opened up near the stack and damaged the lining of the base.

"Some seepage continues" the company said.

The fertilizer company has "immediately implemented additional and extensive groundwater monitoring and sampling regimens and has found no offsite impacts," and has pumped water out of the stack "into an alternative holding area on site to reduce the amount of drainage."

It said it is also "recovering" water from the sinkhole.

Actions which the Florida Department of Environmental Protection have confirmed.

Latest Headlines

Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us

Advertisement