Advertisement

Supreme Court to review North Carolina gerrymandering case

By Allen Cone
The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Monday to study whether North Carolina legislator relied too much on race when they drew new congressional districts five years ago. Photo by Pat Benic/UPI
The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Monday to study whether North Carolina legislator relied too much on race when they drew new congressional districts five years ago. Photo by Pat Benic/UPI | License Photo

WASHINGTON, June 27 (UPI) -- The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday said it will examine whether North Carolina legislators relied too heavily on race in drawing up congressional districts five years ago.

The justices added the case to their fall calendar, meaning the November elections will take place with maps redrawn after a panel of three federal district judges ruled that the legislators factored in race too much when determining two of the state's congressional districts. The judges said the original boundaries violated the 14th Amendment in the 1st and 14th districts.

Advertisement

North Carolina Gov. Patrick McCrory, a Republican, and the state Board of Elections asked the court in April to stay the ruling. The U.S. Supreme Court denied the emergency request.

In the meantime, the Republican-dominated General Assembly redrew the statewide map.

The appeals ruling and legislation delayed the state's congressional primary until June 7. Voters challenged the new map, but the three judges allowed the state to conduct its primary.

In its appeal to the high court, North Carolina says the two districts ensured that blacks have an equal opportunity to vote for preferred candidates in accordance with the Voting Rights Act.

Advertisement

The justices, in taking up the case, noted the federal court found the lines unconstitutional and state Supreme Court had upheld the lines.

Latest Headlines

Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us

Advertisement