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Woman accused in deadly crash at Oklahoma State University parade a flight risk, prosecutors say

By Doug G. Ware
Woman accused in deadly crash at Oklahoma State University parade a flight risk, prosecutors say
Adacia Chambers, 25, faces four counts of second-degree murder stemming from a crash at Oklahoma State University's homecoming parade Saturday. Police say Chambers plowed her vehicle through barricades and into a crowd, killing a 65-year-old couple, a 23-year-old student and a 2-year-old boy. Photo courtesy Stillwater, Okla., Police Department

STILLWATER, Okla., Oct. 26 (UPI) -- A woman who police say plowed her vehicle into a crowd during Oklahoma State University's homecoming parade over the weekend, killing four people, was ordered held on a $1 million bond during her initial court appearance Monday.

Adacia Avery Chambers, 25, faces four counts of second-degree murder for the crash, which occurred in Stillwater, Okla., on Saturday. A 65-year-old couple, a 23-year-old foreign business student and a 2-year-old boy were killed.

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Authorities said about 50 others were injured.

Investigators said Chambers was under the influence at the time of the crash -- possibly of drugs. The woman's father and attorney, though, say she might suffer from an "underlying" mental illness.

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Chambers appeared in court Monday, but has not yet been formally charged in the deaths. A prosecutor said she "intentionally drove her car into a crowd," NBC News reported Monday.

The reason for such a steep bail amount, prosecutors said, is because they believe Chambers -- who faces four life sentences if she's convicted -- is a flight risk.

Floyd Chambers, the woman's father, has said she was hospitalized for about two weeks in 2013 for possible mental health problems. Her attorney also said Chambers' demeanor after the crash Saturday caused him to worry about her mental health.

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The judge on Monday also ordered that Chambers undergo a psychological evaluation.

Although prosecutors believe the crash was intentional, Chambers' father said he doesn't believe it was.

"Adacia is a kind, loving, caring person, and she wouldn't have done this purposefully," he said. "I know the little girl I raised wouldn't have done something like this ... I raised my kids to be Christian people and to keep family and God close to their heart."

Payne County District Attorney Laura Austin Thomas said she believes Chambers was under the influence of drugs, not alcohol, at the time of the crash.

"She doesn't remember a whole lot about what happened," Chambers' attorney, Tony Coleman, told reporters Sunday. "There was a period where I think ... she could have even blacked out."

Police say Chambers plowed her car through several barriers and hit a police motorcycle before the vehicle ran into the crowd.

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