Advertisement

As threats pour in, Darren Wilson in hiding, under protection

The former Ferguson, Missouri, police officer has gone underground, switching homes, dressing incognito and seeking solace in dark movie theaters.

By Matt Bradwell
As threats pour in, Darren Wilson in hiding, under protection
Former Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson. UPI/St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney's office | License Photo

FERGUSON, Mo., Dec. 3 (UPI) -- Already in hiding, former Ferguson, Missouri, police officer Darren Wilson is living under the protection of volunteer off-duty officers.

"Fraternal Order of Police members from the surrounding area volunteered and have provided him with security from that time, right up until the present," the union's spokesman Jim Pasco told CNN.

Advertisement

Pasco said Ferguson police are consistently "unwilling or unable" to offer Wilson protection after a grand jury declined to indict him in the shooting death of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager.

Wilson has gone underground, switching homes, dressing incognito and seeking solace in dark movie theaters.

"He's had to learn to live in a way that makes him completely unnoticeable," Wilson's lawyer Neil Bruntrager said days after the grand jury's decision was announced.

"As a consequence, there are several techniques that he utilizes that make that happen. It's an odd way to live your life. But for him, it's all about his family."

There have been multiple reports of bounties placed on Wilson's head, and on Tuesday a man was arrested in Washington state for publicly encouraging his Facebook followers to "kill this white cop" and "anything that has a badge on."

Advertisement

"We really need to start killing the police ... OOooopppss I mean our oppressors," Jaleel Tariq Abdul-Jabbar wrote in one of many Facebook rants seemingly directed at Wilson and law enforcement in general.

Meanwhile, Michael Brown's stepfather, Louis Head, has publicly apologized for yelling "burn the [expletive] down" to a crowd of demonstrators the night the grand jury decision was announced.

"I was so angry and full of raw emotions, as so many others were, and granted, I screamed out words that I shouldn't have screamed in the heat of the moment," Head said in a statement.

"But to place blame solely on me for the conditions of our community, and country, after the grand jury decision goes way too far and is as wrong as the decision itself."

Latest Headlines

Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us

Advertisement