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2014 voter turnout was lowest since 1942, according to new data

It is estimates that only a little over a third of eligible voters participated in the 2014 election.

By
Thor Benson
A New Hampshire voter exits a polling booth after filling out her ballot for the midterm election inside the Bishop Leo E. Oneil Youth Center in Manchester, New Hampshire on November 4, 2014. Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Scott Brown is challenging New Hampshire Democratic incumbent Senator Jeanne Shaheen in today's elections. UPI/Matthew Healey
A New Hampshire voter exits a polling booth after filling out her ballot for the midterm election inside the Bishop Leo E. Oneil Youth Center in Manchester, New Hampshire on November 4, 2014. Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Scott Brown is challenging New Hampshire Democratic incumbent Senator Jeanne Shaheen in today's elections. UPI/Matthew Healey | License Photo

WASHINGTON, Nov. 10 (UPI) -- Midterm elections typically face lower turnout than presidential elections, but 2014 saw the lowest turnout in 72 years.

It's estimated that only a little over a third (36.6%) of eligible voters participated in the 2014 midterm elections, which is the lowest amount to participate since World War II, according to the United States Election Project.

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Some are claiming, beyond the fact midterm elections typically have lower turnout, voter ID laws and inaccurate voter fraud software contributed to the low numbers. Over $3 billion was spent during the 2014 midterm, despite the fact it was known many voters would not participate. The Fiscal Times calls it the most expensive midterm in U.S. history, with both parties spending similar amounts.

The state of Oregon appears to have produced the highest midterm voter participation for the second time in a row, with roughly 70% of eligible voters attending.

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