Advertisement

Federal appeals court upholds Texas abortion restrictions

A federal appeals court ruled unanimously that Texas can require doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles.

By Frances Burns
1/2
Texas State Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, is a candidate for governor. (Wikimedia Commons/Kevin Sutherland)
Texas State Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, is a candidate for governor. (Wikimedia Commons/Kevin Sutherland)

A federal appeals court ruled unanimously that Texas can require doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles.

In its decision Thursday, the 5th U.S. Circuit panel also upheld a provision that drugs used to induce abortions must be prescribed according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration protocols. U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel had found parts of the law unconstitutional.

Advertisement

In its opinion, the appeals court said evidence presented by Planned Parenthood showed that even with the new limits on providers, 90 percent of Texas women who sought abortions would be able to obtain one at a clinic within 100 miles of their homes.

"If the admitting-privileges regulation burdens abortion access, ... the burden does not fall on the vast majority of Texas women seeking abortions," the judges said.

RELATED Arkansas abortion ban struck down by judge

The decision is expected to be appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The abortion law passed last year made a national figure of state Sen. Wendy Davis, a Democrat who staged a filibuster that delayed its passage. Davis is now running for governor against Attorney General Greg Abbott, a Republican and staunch supporter of the law.

Advertisement

"This unanimous decision is a vindication of the careful deliberation by the Texas Legislature to craft a law to protect the health and safety of Texas women," Abbott said of the ruling.

RELATED Michigan's 'rape insurance' law goes into effect

Davis said Abbott "wants to force his personal political agenda on Texas women."

Backers of new restrictions on abortion-inducing drugs in Texas and other states say they are designed to protect women. Opponents charge the law bans doctors and clinics from using better dosage levels and procedures developed since the FDA approved the drugs.

RELATED Anti-abortion groups sue to restrict Madison, Wis., buffer zones

RELATED Houston abortion clinic first in Texas penalized under new law

RELATED Virginia Senate votes to overturn ultrasound mandate

RELATED Louisiana rescinds controversial abortion rules

RELATED US abortion rate is lowest since 1973

RELATED Wendy Davis reports $12M in donations to Texas governor campaign

RELATED Judge: N.C. abortion ultrasound requirement unconstitutional

Latest Headlines

Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us

Advertisement