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Analysts dismiss Cain on black support

Analysts dismiss Cain on black support
Republican presidential hopeful Herman Cain in Scottsdale, Ariz., Nov. 8,2011. UPI/Art Foxall | License Photo

WASHINGTON, Nov. 25 (UPI) -- Republican U.S. presidential hopeful Herman Cain's assertion that he could win over black voters is being dismissed by political analysts.

In a recent mailer sent to Iowa voters, Cain says "as a descendent of slaves I can lead the Republican party to victory by garnering a large share of the black vote, something that has not been done since Dwight Eisenhower garnered 41 percent of the black vote in 1956."

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Political analysts seem to agree it is unlikely that Cain will gain a following amongst black voters, The Washington Post reported.

"If he's talking about 41 percent of black voters in the Republican primary, he might be right," said Michael Dawson, an African-American political science professor at the University of Chicago.

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Dawson said in a general election against President Barack Obama, who got 95 percent of the black vote in 2008 and is still a favorite among African-Americans, Cain "would be lucky to get 10 percent" of the black vote.

David Bositis, a senior political analyst for the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, argued that as the Republican Party grows more white and conservative, it represents the interests of black people less.

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"The fact of the matter is, there are no more savvy voters in the country than African-American voters, and they're not interested in any candidate who is not promising them more and better jobs, more and better education, more and better health care and an agenda that aims to deal with the historic racism in the country," Bositis said. "None of those things are being offered by the Republicans, including Herman Cain."

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Tara Wall, a conservative African-American political analyst and a former senior adviser to the Republican National Committee, is less dismissive of Cain.

"I wouldn't take what [Cain's] saying too flippantly," Wall said.

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