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Soldier charged in alleged spying attempt

Spc. William C. Millay.
Spc. William C. Millay.

ANCHORAGE, Alaska, Nov. 8 (UPI) -- Formal charges were filed against a U.S. soldier for allegedly turning information that could be used by a foreign power over to what he thought was a spy.

Spc. William C. Millay, a military policeman at a base near Anchorage, Alaska, has been jailed since his Oct. 28 arrest, the Anchorage Daily News reported Tuesday.

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An Army spokesman in Alaska provided a two-page statement with a summary of the charges but would not provide charging documents and did not say which foreign country Millay allegedly believed he was helping.

"Millay had access to the information through the course of his normal duties both stateside and on a previous deployment, and although the information was unclassified, Millay believed that it could be used to the advantage of a foreign nation," the Army statement said.

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Millay, who had been deployed for combat duty in Iraq from December 2009 to July 2010, also was charged with five other criminal violations, including lying to investigators and asking another service member for classified information and objects he could give to the person he believed was a spy.

The Army did not say but implied government agents targeted Millay in an undercover sting and did not say if the United States was hurt by his alleged actions. Nor did the Army make clear whether the foreign country was hostile to the United States or an ally.

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Millay, who is from Owensboro, Ky., could face court-martial.

Military officials have told NBC News Millay allegedly had offered to sell classified information to an undercover police officer because he was upset he had not been deployed to Afghanistan with his unit.

Attorney Stephen Karns said in an e-mail Monday he had just gotten the charges and had not spoken with Millay about them yet.

"I also haven't received any of the evidence, so it's difficult to comment at this time other than to say that my client is innocent," Karns wrote. "The charges sound far worse than what I think anyone who knows him would say he's capable of doing."

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