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TSA insists scanners are safe

TSA insists scanners are safe
A departing passenger undergoes a full-body scan conducted by Transportation Security Administration (TSA) agents at Denver International Airport (DIA) the day before the Thanksgiving holiday on November 24, 2010 in Denver. DIA officials expect a record number of passengers to pass through the airport. A passenger boycott of the full body scanners did not appear to materialize at DIA. UPI/Gary C. Caskey | License Photo

WASHINGTON, March 12 (UPI) -- The Transportation Security Administration says it has ordered retesting of all radiation-emitting full-body scanners.

However, the TSA said there is no danger to those screened at airports by the devices, CNN reported Saturday.

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An internal review found issues with paperwork provided by contractors who regularly check the machines' radiation levels.

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano told a Senate committee Wednesday that independent studies concluded the machines are "more than safe."

"The amount of radiation is approximately (the same as received) as two minutes in the air," Napolitano said.

The TSA said it ordered the retesting because of "record-keeping errors."

"We're taking a number of steps to ensure the mistakes aren't repeated and the public will be able to see for themselves by reviewing all future reports online," said TSA spokesman Nicholas Kimball.

He said while the scanners are safe, "these record-keeping errors are not acceptable."

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