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Muslim woman's foster claim investigated

BALTIMORE, July 16 (UPI) -- Baltimore officials say they will investigate a claim by a Muslim woman that she was denied a foster care license because she does not allow pork in her home.

The Baltimore City Community Relations Commission, charged with enforcing the city's anti-discrimination laws, will investigate whether Contemporary Family Services denied a license to Tashima Crudup, a mother of five who wanted to serve as a foster parent, The Baltimore Sun reported Friday.

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The commission will request documents from both sides, Ajmel Quereshi, an attorney for the ACLU representing Crudup, said.

Contemporary Family Services, which is authorized by the state to place foster children with families, said Crudup's application was denied because her inability to yield in her stance could make her intractable in other issues involving children.

Contemporary Family Services has previously screened and granted licenses to Muslims, Seventh-day Adventists and members of other religions with dietary restrictions, a company representative said.

Crudup had cleared a screening process and completed training before her application was denied after a home visit from a CFS worker in August 2009, the newspaper reported.

Though she doesn't allow pork in her house, Crudup said she told the caseworker she would have no problem with children under her care eating it at school outings or in restaurants, the Sun reported.

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