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McConnell: Brown's election sent message

McConnell: Brown's election sent message
Newly elected U.S. Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., shown here speaking during his celebration at the Park Plaza in Boston Tuesday night, said Wednesday Democratic President Barack Obama called him to say he looked forward to working with him on issues. UPI/Matthew Healey | License Photo

WASHINGTON, Jan. 20 (UPI) -- Massachusetts voters sent a message in electing Republican Scott Brown to a U.S. Senate seat held by Democrats for nearly 50 years, the Senate GOP leader said.

"They're tired of bailouts, tired of government spending when people are spending less and they don't want the government taking over healthcare," Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said during a news conference Wednesday.

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"I think the majority got the message -- no more gamesmanship here; no more lack of transparency," McConnell said. "Let's move forward with our policy debate."

McConnell said he has been assured there would be "no gamesmanship" in seating Brown, noting that one Democratic senator said he wouldn't vote on healthcare legislation until Brown was seated.

The minority leader also said he understood Massachusetts elections officials would work swiftly to certify the election of the successor to the late Edward M. Kennedy.

In Boston, Brown said Massachusetts' electorate told him they were tired of "behind-the-scene deals" and that they wanted elected officials "do to things in a transparent manner with (the public's) best interests in mind."

Brown said taxes, government spending, terrorism and healthcare were issues of importance to Massachusetts voters.

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"I think it's important for everyone to get healthcare," Brown said when asked about being the 41st senator and denying Democrats the critical 60 votes to overcome a Republican filibuster. "(Bring) it back to the drawing board -- there are (some) very good things in the national plan proposed."

Brown said he wasn't "beholding to the special interests of the party" when asked whether he was the model for a GOP resurgence.

"I want to make sure we solve problems," he said.

President Obama called Tuesday soon after the outcome was determined, Brown said, with the president saying he was looking forward to them working together.

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