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Muslim Brotherhood isn't satisfied

Muslim Brotherhood isn't satisfied
Egyptian anti-government demonstrators camp next to an army tank in Cairo's Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 on the 14th day of protests calling for the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak. UPI | License Photo

CAIRO, Feb. 7 (UPI) -- The opposition Muslim Brotherhood said it wasn't satisfied with concessions brokered during weekend talks with Egypt's vice president.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak announced last week as his country descended into political violence that he wouldn't seek another term during elections scheduled for later this year.

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Leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood met Sunday with Vice President Omar Suleiman to discuss steps needed to transition to the post-Mubarak era in Egypt.

The Muslim Brotherhood, however, said that its participation in talks with the government was "contingent on the implementation of the demands advocated by the ... protesters," Egyptian newspaper al-Masry al-Youm reports.

Egyptian protesters, inspired by the Jasmine Revolution in Tunisia, continued calls for Mubarak to resign as demonstrations entered their 14th day Monday.

Members of the international community are issuing careful statements saying the transition toward inclusive democracy in Egypt should begin immediately.

Cairo should "meet the aspirations of the Egyptian people with political reform not repression," noted British Prime Minister David Cameron during a Monday speech before members of Parliament.

The Muslim Brotherhood in its statement said it was calling for an end to emergency laws, constitutional reforms to open the political process and recognition that the protest movement is part of a wider national voice.

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Mubarak, 82, took office in 1981. Cairo spent much of July deflecting claims that the health of the president was failing after he had his gall bladder removed early that year.

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