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On This Day: 'Peanuts' published for first time

On Oct. 2, 1950, the "Peanuts" comic strip by Charles M. Schulz was published for the first time.

By UPI Staff
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The Charlie Brown balloon floats down the parade route at the Macy's 86th Annual Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City on November 22, 2012. On October 3, 1950, the "Peanuts" comic strip by Charles M. Schulz was published for the first time. File Photo by John Angelillo/UPI | <a href="/News_Photos/lp/aa40a9e084c6228e604042f5defbfc99/" target="_blank">License Photo</a>
The Charlie Brown balloon floats down the parade route at the Macy's 86th Annual Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City on November 22, 2012. On October 3, 1950, the "Peanuts" comic strip by Charles M. Schulz was published for the first time. File Photo by John Angelillo/UPI | License Photo

Oct. 2 (UPI) -- On this date in history:

In 1925, Scottish inventor John Logie Baird performed the first test of a working television system.

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In 1950, the "Peanuts" comic strip by Charles M. Schulz was published for the first time. The comic ran for 50 years until Schulz's death in 2000 from cancer.

In 1959, The Twilight Zone, with host Rod Serling, premiered on U.S. television. CBS revived the sci-fi anthology show in 2018 with Jordan Peele as host.

In 1967, Thurgood Marshall was sworn in as the first African-American justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

In 1970, a plane crash in Colorado killed 31 people, including members of the Wichita State University football team.

In 1984, Richard Miller became the first FBI agent to be charged with espionage. He was convicted of passing government secrets to the Soviet Union through his Russian lover.

In 1985, actor Rock Hudson died of AIDS. He was 59. The first celebrity to publicly acknowledge he suffered from AIDS, Hudson's final days were marked by visits from screen legends.

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In 2001, NATO said the United States had shown evidence, sufficient to justify military action, that Osama bin Laden and al-Qaida were responsible for the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

File Photo by Chris Corder/UPI

In 2002, a 55-year-old Maryland man was slain in the first in a series of apparent random sniper attacks that terrorized the Washington area for three weeks. John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo were both convicted of capital murder for the killings, which numbered 17 in total. Muhammad was executed Nov. 10, 2009. Malvo was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

In 2006, five Amish girls were fatally shot in a rural, one-room schoolhouse in Nickle Mines, Pa. The suspect, a milk truck driver who also killed himself, had told his wife he needed to avenge something that had happened 20 years earlier.

File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI

In 2020, President Donald Trump announced he and first lady Melania Trump were diagnosed with COVID-19. The president would go on to be hospitalized at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for treatment.

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File Photo by Oliver Contreras/UPI

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