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On This Day: Eisenhower becomes first president to ride in helicopter

On July 12, 1957, Dwight D. Eisenhower became the first sitting president to ride in a helicopter.

By UPI Staff
On This Day: Eisenhower becomes first president to ride in helicopter
In this June 14, 1957, file photo, the UH-13 Bell Ranger presidential helicopter undergoes a series of practice landings on the White House lawn to familiarize Air Force pilots, Maj. Joseph E. Barrett and Capt. Laurence R. Cummings, with the flight path and landing marks. On July 12, President Eisenhower became the first sitting president to fly in a helicopter. Photo courtesy National Museum of the USAF/UPI

July 12 (UPI) -- On this date in history:

In 1862, the U.S. Congress authorized a new award, the Medal of Honor, highest military decoration for valor against an enemy.

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In 1933, a U.S. industrial code was established to fix a minimum wage of 40 cents an hour.

In 1957, Dwight D. Eisenhower became the first sitting president to ride in a helicopter. He traveled in a Bell Ranger as part of a nationwide civil defense exercise. The presidential helicopter has always been called Marine One.

In 1962, the Rolling Stones gave their first public performance -- at the Marquee Club in London.

File Photo by Ezio Petersen/UPI

In 1984, Democratic presidential nominee Walter Mondale named U.S. Rep. Geraldine Ferraro, D-N.Y., as his running mate. She was the first woman to share a major U.S. political party's presidential ticket. Mondale lost in November to incumbent Ronald Reagan.

In 1990, Boris Yeltsin quit the Soviet Communist Party, saying he wanted to concentrate on his duties as president of the Russian republic.

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In 2008, Tony Snow, who was press secretary under U.S. President George W. Bush and a Fox News Channel host, died of cancer at age 53.

The urn containing the ashes of former White House press secretary Tony Snow is carried out of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception following his funeral service in Washington on July 17, 2008. File Photo by Kevin DietschUPI

In 2011, Ahmed Wali Karzai, 48, a half-brother of Afghan President Hamid Karzai and a powerful figure in Kandahar, was killed at his home by a bodyguard.

In 2013, a suicide bomber detonated his explosive vest in a Kirkuk, Iraq, coffee shop, killing at least 33 people and injuring more than two-dozen others. It was the latest in a wave of random attacks that killed more than 2,000 people in the country since April.

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