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Report: Obama considers Iran gas cut-off

FLASHBACK: An Iranian driver fuels his car at a gas station in Tehran, Iran on May 24, 2007. Iran increased the price of gasoline by 25 percent Tuesday, trying to reduce subsidies in a decision likely to deepen dissatisfaction with the government of hard-line President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. The price was raised to 38 cents from 30 cents a gallon. The average price in the United States at this time is approximately $3.18. (UPI Photo/Mohammad Kheirkhah)
FLASHBACK: An Iranian driver fuels his car at a gas station in Tehran, Iran on May 24, 2007. Iran increased the price of gasoline by 25 percent Tuesday, trying to reduce subsidies in a decision likely to deepen dissatisfaction with the government of hard-line President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. The price was raised to 38 cents from 30 cents a gallon. The average price in the United States at this time is approximately $3.18. (UPI Photo/Mohammad Kheirkhah) | License Photo

WASHINGTON, Aug. 3 (UPI) -- The United States is considering a move in cooperation with allied countries to cut off Iran's gasoline imports, foreign officials say.

The Obama administration has broached the idea of cutting off Tehran's supplies of gasoline and other refined oil products if it refuses to negotiate on its nuclear program with European allies and Israeli officials, who spoke to Monday's New York Times on condition of anonymity.

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White House national security adviser James Jones mentioned the possibility of an extreme economic sanction in a visit to Israel last week, the newspaper said.

The Times said the White House refused to confirm or deny the reports. But unnamed administration officials said the move is meant to buttress President Barack Obama's efforts to get Israeli officials to stop dropping hints about a possible military strike on Iran's nuclear facilities if no progress is made this year, the newspaper said.

The sources also reportedly said Obama is attempting to gain more time for efforts by U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to develop what she has called "crippling sanctions" against Tehran designed to force it to negotiate on its nuclear program.



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