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Farm bill opponents unlikely to sue

WASHINGTON, May 27 (UPI) -- Critics say they aren't considering a legal challenge to the farm bill, even though a mistake raised concerns that the measure violates the U.S. Constitution.

Several groups -- including Club for Growth, National Taxpayers Union and the Environmental Working Group -- and congressional critics of the $307 billion legislation said they weren't considering fighting to overturn the bill in court, even though an entire section on trade policy was inadvertently absent from the version President George Bush vetoed, The Hill reported Tuesday.

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Congress overwhelmingly overrode Bush's veto of the bill without the section, making the measure law.

Lawmakers said they plan to consider the absent section, which Democrats said was non-controversial, when Congress reconvenes in June.

House Republicans and other critics say the new law violates the constitutional requirement that both chambers and the president consider identical bills.

In interviews with the Washington publication, representatives for the groups said it would be difficult they had legal standing to sue. If they were successful in that argument, Congress could thwart lawsuits by considering and approving the entire bill, negating the need for litigation.

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"They have the recourse to put this whole thing to rest," said Nachama Soloveichik, a Club for Growth spokeswoman.

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