San Francisco Giants, St. Louis Cardinals interested in Miami Marlins' Giancarlo Stanton

By Alex Butler  |  July 16, 2017 at 3:47 PM
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July 16 (UPI) -- A no-trade clause hasn't stopped teams from asking the Miami Marlins about Giancarlo Stanton's availability.

Sources told SiriusXM radio that teams are "calling the Marlins on Stanton." The report stated that there is a "belief" that Stanton is willing to waive his no-trade clause and that the San Francisco Giants are showing the most interest. The St. Louis Cardinals also "checked in." Sources told SiriusXM radio that Stanton "prefers to stay" with the Marlins if the team stays together.

The 27-year-old outfielder is having one of his best seasons. Stanton has a league-high 26 home runs, 59 RBI and is hitting .275 through 88 games. The four-time All-Star signed a 13-year, $325 million contract with the Marlins in 2014. He is due $14.5 million this season, but his salary escalates to $25 million in 2018. He'll make $32 million annually, from 2023 through 2025. Stanton can opt out of that mega-deal after the 2020 season.

Major League Baseball's non-waiver trade deadline is July 31.

The Giants have a league-worst 77 home runs this season and have the third-fewest runs scored in baseball. Stanton was born in Panorama City, Calif. and went to high school in Sherman Oaks.

Despite trade rumors regarding many of its players, Marlins president Michael Hill told FanRag Sports that the club has no intention of trading Christian Yelich, Marcell Ozuna or J.T. Realmuto and that there have been "no talks" regarding Stanton.

"We haven't put his name out there," Hill told FanRag Sports.

In early July, the Miami Herald reported that the Marlins were scouting at least six fam systems in preparation for a "likely roster sell-off." MLB sources told the Herald that the team was focusing on the New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox, Milwaukee Brewers, Colorado Rockies and Chicago Cubs for a return of prospects. But that doesn't mean the club wouldnt be interested in dealing with other franchises.

Three sources told Fox Sports last week about a potential trade "concept" involving Stanton and the Philadelphia Phillies. That deal involved the Marlins sending Stanton and Yelich to Philadelphia, with the Phillies absorbing their contracts. The $339.5 million in combined salary would have limited the Marlins' return of prospects, according to the report. Those sources told Fox Sports that "conversations" never got started, but the Phillies discussed the "concept internally." Philadelphia did not express interest in Stanton, according to both franchises. Sources told Fox Sports that the Phillies have been "vocal" about wanting to land Yelich.

The Marlins traded shortstop Adeiny Hechavarria to the Tampa Bay Rays in June, but are expected to make more moves.

A source told the Herald last week that the Yankees were pursing a trade for Marlins first baseman Justin Bour. That report also stated that David Phelps, A.J. Ramos and Martin Prado were the most "at risk" players to be moved by the franchise.

Sources recently told FanRag Sports that the Los Angeles Angels, Toronto Blue Jays and Kansas City Royals have "mentioned" Marlins second baseman Dee Gordon in trade talks. Sources told USA Today that more than 10 teams have asked about Phelps.

If the Marlins are interested in top prospects, the Atlanta Braves, Yankees, Chicago White Sox, San Diego Padres and Milwaukee Brewers have the top-five farm systems, according to MLBPipeline.com.

The Los Angeles Dodgers, Pittsburgh Pirates, Colorado Rockies, Cincinnati Reds and Tampa Bay Rays round out the top-10 minor league systems.

The Braves and White Sox each have a league-high nine of the Top 100 prospects in baseball, after the White Sox acquired several young stars last week by trading Jose Quintana to the Chicago Cubs.

This offseason, the Marlins ranked dead last in Baseball America's organizational talent rankings. The franchise has ranked 25th or worse in those rankings in five out of the last six years.

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