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Davies, O'Meara enter World Golf Hall of Fame

By
The Sports Xchange
Laura Davies tees off on the first hole during the first round of the HSBC World Match Play Championship at Wykagyl Country Club in New Rochelle, New York on July 19, 2007. (UPI Photo/John Angelillo)
Laura Davies tees off on the first hole during the first round of the HSBC World Match Play Championship at Wykagyl Country Club in New Rochelle, New York on July 19, 2007. (UPI Photo/John Angelillo) | License Photo

With four major titles and more than 70 wins on the LPGA Tour, Laura Davies had her place in golf history cemented long before Monday, when she was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame at St. Andrews, Scotland.

Davies was inducted along with major champions Mark O'Meara of the United States and David Graham of Australia. Late architect A.W. Tillinghast also shared the honor.

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However, it was Davies who stole the spotlight -- she missed the induction ceremony because her 10 p.m. Sunday flight from Philadelphia was delayed for four hours.

The 51-year-old made the cut at the U.S. Women's Open over the weekend at Lancaster, Pa., where she tied for 47th.

When she finally arrived, many of those in attendance were astounded and appreciative of her effort.

"Everything that seems to happen to me is weird," Davies said at the reception.

Davies is considered by many to be the most successful female British player of all time. She has represented Europe a record 12 times in the Solheim Cup, playing in every competition from 1990-2011.

She was recently made a Dame by the Queen of England for her services to the sport of golf.

O'Meara has been rock steady throughout his career and really established himself as one of the game's greats in 1998. He won the Masters and Open Championship that season, and he was also named Player of the Year.

He earned more than 20 victories worldwide, and he represented the U.S. in five Ryder Cups.

Graham's two biggest wins came on American soil when he won the 1979 PGA Championship and the U.S. Open at Merion in 1981.

More remarkable is that Graham is one of only four players to win events on six continents, joining Hale Irwin, Bernhard Langer and Gary Player.

Tillinghast was a prolific architect of golf courses and considered a true pioneer of the American game. In total, his courses have been host to 50 major championships. He died in 1942 at age 68.

Bethpage State Park, Winged Foot, Baltusrol Golf Club, San Francisco Golf Club, Quaker Ridge and Somerset Hills are all Tillinghast designs.

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