Advertisement

Boeing's fuel-efficient aircraft design wins $425 million award from NASA

Boeing's more fuel-efficient airline design won an award from NASA on Wednesday, as the agency plans to invest $425 million in the project. Photo from NASA
Boeing's more fuel-efficient airline design won an award from NASA on Wednesday, as the agency plans to invest $425 million in the project. Photo from NASA

Jan. 18 (UPI) -- Boeing's sustainable flight demonstrator project won an award Wednesday from NASA, as the company aims to roll out green single-aisle airliners by the end of the decade.

The space agency will invest $425 million to help Boeing build a more fuel-efficient airline. Boeing and its partners will contribute $725 million in funding, with plans to begin testing the new aircraft by the late 2020's.

Advertisement

"Since the beginning, NASA has been with you when you fly. NASA has dared to go farther, faster, higher. And in doing so, NASA has made aviation more sustainable and dependable. It is in our DNA," said NASA Administrator Bill Nelson.

"It's our goal that NASA's partnership with Boeing to produce and test a full-scale demonstrator will help lead to future commercial airliners that are more fuel efficient, with benefits to the environment, the commercial aviation industry, and to passengers worldwide. If we are successful, we may see these technologies in planes that the public takes to the skies in the 2030s."

According to NASA, single-aisle aircraft account for nearly half of worldwide aviation emissions. The new Boeing aircraft is more fuel-efficient because of its extra-long thin wings, which create less drag.

Advertisement

The new Boeing aircraft could go into use by the 2030s. The United States is currently aiming to achieve net-zero carbon aviation emissions by 2050. The International Civil Aviation Organization also has the same goal.

"NASA is working toward an ambitious goal of developing game-changing technologies to reduce aviation energy use and emissions over the coming decades toward an aviation community goal of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050," said Bob Pearce, NASA associate administrator for the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate.

Latest Headlines