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SpaceX launches first C-band television broadcast satellite into space for SES

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SpaceX launches a communications satellite for SES of Luxembourg at the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida on Wednesday afternoon. Photo by Joe Marino/UPI | <a href="/News_Photos/lp/85c42dc144c63f5a3cb13a0e8c784784/" target="_blank">License Photo</a>
SpaceX launches a communications satellite for SES of Luxembourg at the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida on Wednesday afternoon. Photo by Joe Marino/UPI | License Photo

June 30 (UPI) -- The first television broadcast satellite under SES's C-band lifted off from Cape Canaveral on Wednesday evening on a SpaceX rocket.

SES, a video and data solutions company, said the satellite will free up the lower 300 MHz of C-band spectrum to ensure the company can provide video and data services to its customers while enabling wireless operators to quickly deploy 5G services across the United States.

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The SES-22 satellite is the first of six geostationary satellites that SES ordered to migrate broadcast customers into the narrower swath of C-band. Northrop Grumman and Boeing are building two C-band satellites apiece for the company.

"We are thrilled with the successful launch of SES-22, thanks to our partners at Thales Alenia Space and SpaceX," Steve Collar, CEO of SES, in a statement.

"The launch of SES-22, together with other upcoming C-band satellite launches scheduled this year, will enable us to continue providing the high-quality services that our customers have been accustomed to over the last several decades while freeing up spectrum that will enable the U.S. to rapidly unlock the promise of 5G."

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Hervé Derrey, president and CEO of Thales Alenia Space, said the successful launch was the culmination of a long working relationship between the two tech companies.

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SES will launch four more C-band satellites this year, with two being launched by United Launch Alliance and two others by SpaceX. The sixth satellite SES ordered is being held back as a ground spare, according to Space News.

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The International Space Station is pictured from the SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour during a flyaround of the orbiting lab that took place following its undocking from the Harmony module’s space-facing port on November 8. Photo courtesy of NASA

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