Advertisement

Eight nations, including U.S., sign accords for moon missions

NASA's Space Launch System rocket is shown in this artist's concept launching into space for a lunar mission, which would be governed by a new framework signed Tuesday by eight nations. Image courtesy of NASA
NASA's Space Launch System rocket is shown in this artist's concept launching into space for a lunar mission, which would be governed by a new framework signed Tuesday by eight nations. Image courtesy of NASA

ORLANDO, Fla., Oct. 13 (UPI) -- Eight nations have signed NASA's new framework to govern lunar exploration missions, the agency's administrator, Jim Bridenstine, announced Tuesday.

By signing the agreement, the eight nations commit to peaceful activities on the moon and in travel to the moon.

Advertisement

Provisions in the Artemis Accords stipulate that nations, and private companies in those nations, will openly disclose plans for lunar missions, and mine resources on the moon in accordance with the international Outer Space Treaty that dates to 1967.

The accords also commit signing nations to render aid to other nations on the moon if necessary, to minimize space debris and to register all objects taken to the lunar surface.

RELATED Blue Origin launches, lands NASA moon landing sensor experiment

In addition to the United States, Australia, Canada, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, United Arab Emirates and Britain signed the Artemis Accords.

"We are one human race and we are in this together. The Accords help us to work together to benefit all," Sarah Al Amiri, chair of the United Arab Emirates Council of Scientists, said in a live broadcast Tuesday.

Bridenstine had said in a press conference Monday that more nations are expected to sign the accords this year, and that he hopes all nations eventually will.

Advertisement
RELATED Space agency leaders call for greater international cooperation

"As NASA, we always try to be very transparent and what our plans and policies are, and we think it's good for all nations to be transparent with their plans," Bridenstine said.

The new agreement comes as NASA plans to return astronauts to the moon in 2024, with further plans to establish a lunar base to tap water ice for possible long-term habitation.

NASA officials on Monday acknowledged they didn't approach all space-faring nations in drafting the accords because the agency wanted to move quickly. NASA sought a few nations believed to have common values, said Mike Gold, associate administrator for NASA's Office of International and Interagency Relations.

RELATED U.S. space mining policies may trigger regulatory 'race to the bottom,' scientists warn

"We wanted to begin with a group substantive and large enough to make an impact," Gold said. "It's very challenging to do that with too large a group. Now that the text of the accords have been finalized we can broaden the coalition."

Bridenstine said NASA couldn't approach China, which already has landed two robotic missions on the moon, because federal law prohibits negotiations with China.

When asked how the accords would be enforced, Bridenstine said the intent of the agreement is to pre-empt conflict by being transparent.

"If one of the participants chooses to disregard the guidance, other participants ... ultimately could be asked to leave the Artemis program, but I would hope that they will come to a better resolution," Bridenstine said.

Advertisement

NASA's women astronauts -- at least one likely to walk on moon

Jasmin Moghbeli
Moghbeli poses for a portrait in the Systems Engineering Simulator for the International Space Station and advanced spaceflight programs at the Johnson Space Center on July 9, 2019. She will train for the moon mission. Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA

NASA's women astronauts -- at least one likely to walk on moon

Jasmin Moghbeli
Moghbeli poses for a portrait in the Systems Engineering Simulator for the International Space Station and advanced spaceflight programs at the Johnson Space Center on July 9, 2019. She will train for the moon mission. Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA

Latest Headlines