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SpaceX delays Starlink launch again due to weather

SpaceX postponed the launch of a Falcon 9 rocket carrying Starlink satellites on Wednesday from Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Photo by Joe Marino/UPI
SpaceX postponed the launch of a Falcon 9 rocket carrying Starlink satellites on Wednesday from Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Photo by Joe Marino/UPI | License Photo

ORLANDO, Fla., July 8 (UPI) -- SpaceX postponed the launch of more Starlink communications satellites from Florida on Wednesday when a line of storms neared the launch pad.

A backup launch attempt had been planned for Thursday, but SpaceX did not confirm after the postponement that will occur.

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The Falcon 9 rocket had been scheduled for liftoff at 11:59 a.m. from Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida -- SpaceX's 10th regular launch of Starlink.

The rocket was topped with 57 Starlink spacecraft for Elon Musk's SpaceX, along with two small Earth observation satellites for Seattle-based BlackSky Global.

SpaceX delayed plans for launching the mission on June 25 and 26, when the company said it needed additional time for prelaunch checkouts.

Eventually, SpaceX aims to launch thousands of Starlink satellites to establish global, high-speed broadband Internet service.

Launching Starlink regularly means SpaceX can take other paying customers, such as BlackSky, along for the ride -- and for revenue.

BlackSky offers images and monitoring from space for industries that include defense, energy, construction and research.

Starlink will be available to any individual or organization, SpaceX has said, but the cost of the service hasn't been announced.

Astronauts make round trip to space station from U.S. soil

NASA astronaut Douglas Hurley (C) waves to onlookers as he boards a plane at Naval Air Station Pensacola to return him and NASA astronaut Robert Behnken home to Houston a few hours after the duo landed in their SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour spacecraft off the coast of Pensacola, Fla,, on August 2, 2020. Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA | License Photo

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