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NASA offers satellite view of Tropical Storm Enrique

"The National Hurricane Center expects little change in strength during the next day or so," NASA officials wrote of the storm.

By Brooks Hays
NASA offers satellite view of Tropical Storm Enrique
A satellite image shows Tropical Storm Enrique. Photo by NASA/NOAA GOES Project

WASHINGTON, July 14 (UPI) -- Officially named on Monday, Tropical Storm Enrique is the fifth storm to form in the eastern Pacific.

Early Tuesday, NOAA's GOES-West satellite passed atop the storm, snapping a series of bird's-eye images -- which NASA later shared on its website.

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Boasting only 45-mph winds, with gusts up to 60, and headed northwest out to open ocean, the storm isn't a threat to land. It's expected to slow and dissipate later this week as it runs into wind shear farther to sea.

"The National Hurricane Center expects little change in strength during the next day or so," NASA officials wrote. "After that time, Enrique is expected to weaken while it moves into an area of increasing southerly wind shear and over cooler waters."

Though not particularly powerful, the storm (as can be seen from the satellite imagery) boasts a thick white center, which indicates a high concentration of thunder storms.

"The center is now embedded within the deep convection, which, in fact, has increased during the past several hours," NOAA forecasters wrote in an update Tuesday. "The upper-level outflow has also expanded westward and became better defined."

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