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Fred Sanger, two-time winner of Nobel Prize, dies at 95

CAMBRIDGE, England, Nov. 20 (UPI) -- Fred Sanger, who twice won the Nobel Prize for chemistry, has died at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge, England, colleagues said. He was 95.

Adrian Penrose, spokesman for the Medical Research Council in Cambridge confirmed Sanger's death, The New York Times reported Wednesday. There was no word on when he died or the cause of death.

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Sanger was best known for his pioneering research into the human genome, the Cambridge News said.

A native of Gloucestershire, England, he earned a doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Cambridge in 1943. By 1958, he had received his first Nobel prize, for his work in determining the structure of insulin.

As head of the division of protein chemistry in the MRC Laboratory for Molecular Biology at Cambridge, Sanger and his team developed a rapid way to sequence, or "read," DNA. That research was the forerunner of work on the human genome and led to him being awarded a second Nobel in 1980.

Sanger retired in 1983.

He was one of only four people to receive two Nobel Prizes.

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