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Apollo 8 crew plans to reminisce

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This photo of "Earthrise" over the lunar horizon was taken by the Apollo 8 crew 35 years ago in December 1968, showing Earth for the first time as it appears from deep space. Astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and William Anders had become the first humans to leave Earth orbit, entering lunar orbit on Christmas Eve. In a historic live broadcast that night, the crew took turns reading from the Book of Genesis, closing with a holiday wish from Commander Borman: "We close with good night, good luck, a Merry Christmas, and God bless all of you -- all of you on the good Earth." (UPI Photo/NASA) | <a href="/News_Photos/lp/8fb051b45cb3daea3010bf72fe60b2a6/" target="_blank">License Photo</a>
This photo of "Earthrise" over the lunar horizon was taken by the Apollo 8 crew 35 years ago in December 1968, showing Earth for the first time as it appears from deep space. Astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and William Anders had become the first humans to leave Earth orbit, entering lunar orbit on Christmas Eve. In a historic live broadcast that night, the crew took turns reading from the Book of Genesis, closing with a holiday wish from Commander Borman: "We close with good night, good luck, a Merry Christmas, and God bless all of you -- all of you on the good Earth." (UPI Photo/NASA) | License Photo

WASHINGTON, Nov. 10 (UPI) -- Nearly 40 years after the U.S. space agency sent Apollo 8 astronauts to the moon, those adventurers are planning a public reminiscence.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration says the Apollo 8 crew members will take part in a special television program produced in cooperation with the Newseum in Washington. The 1:30 p.m. EST Thursday program will feature Apollo 8 crew members Frank Borman, James Lovell and William Anders. It will be broadcast live from the Newseum on NASA Television and www.nasa.gov.

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The event is part of the Newseum's commemoration of NASA's 50th anniversary and will be open to visitors on a first-come, first-served basis.

During the 60-minute program, NASA said Borman, Lovell and Anders will discuss their epic December 1968 lunar orbital mission and how the success of Apollo 8 contributed to the overall moon-landing effort that culminated just six months later with Apollo 11. The crew also will discuss the years following Apollo and the future of space exploration.

The program will be moderated by Nick Clooney, the Newseum's journalist in residence.

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More information about how to stream NASA TV live video on the Internet is available at http://www.nasa.gov/ntv.

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