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Letter that arrived 68 years late returned to family

Letter that arrived 68 years late returned to family
Susan Nordin, of Duluth, Minn., used social media to find a family member of the intended recipient of a letter that arrived at her home 68 years after it was mailed from Denmark. File Photo by John Angelillo/UPI | License Photo

Dec. 28 (UPI) -- A Minnesota woman who received a letter that had been mailed to her address 68 years earlier was able to return the long-lost correspondence to a family member of the intended recipients.

Susan Nordin, who moved into her home in the Morgan Park neighborhood of Duluth in October, said a mysterious letter recently appeared at her home.

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"I looked at it just like this, and I said, 'Oh, it's from Copenhagen, and it's from 1953,'" Nordin told KQDS-TV.

The letter, addressed to Mr. and Mrs. Ed Nelson, announced the birth of a baby named Jimmy.

Nordin enlisted the help of the Morgan Park Community page on Facebook to help identify the family who used to occupy her home.

She said locals on the page were able to help contact Connie Anderholm, Ed Nelson's granddaughter, who lives in Ohio.

Anderholm, whose mother sold the house after inheriting it from her late grandparents, said the letter was authored by her parents and announced the birth of her brother, Jim. She said her father was deployed to Germany at the time and the couple was in Copenhagen when her mother went into labor.

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Nordin said contacting Anderholm also solved the mystery of why "Jim and Connie" was engraved on her back steps.

"My grandpa Ed did that, I'm pretty sure," Anderholm said. She said her grandfather did a lot of the construction on the house himself.

Anderholm said the letter was a nice reminder of her brother, who recently died.

"He did pass away last August," she said. "I've just had a real strong urge to call him about this, and I know he'd get a kick of out of it."

She said the rest of Jim's family was also excited to learn about the letter.

"I messaged his daughter, my niece, and she called me and said, 'I can't stop crying,'" Anderholm said.

It was unclear how the letter came to be lost in the mail for nearly seven decades.

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