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St. Louis moves 122-year-old home seven-tenths of a mile

By Ben Hooper
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St. Louis moves 122-year-old home seven-tenths of a mile
Sightseers watch as the 122 year-old home of Charlsetta Taylor makes a turn onto her new street while it is moved in St. Louis on February 26, 2017. The home is being relocated from the site where the new National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) is to be built. The new 97-acre site will house 3,100 employees. Taylor's home built in 1895, is moving seven-tenths of a mile from its old location. Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI | License Photo

Feb. 26 (UPI) -- The city of St. Louis, Mo., moved a 122-year-old house about seven-tenths of a mile to make room for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency's new campus.

The home of Charlesetta Taylor, 81, was loaded onto a truck Sunday morning and slowly driven through the city's streets to its new location.

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Taylor had been a vocal opponent of the St. Louis Development Corp.'s plan to give the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency a 96-acre sits for its new $1.75 billion campus, leading officials to promise Taylor they would move her home to a new location of her choosing outside the area of the eminent domain project.

"This is making good on a promise that we made," Mayor Francis Slay said in a statement provided to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

The process of moving the home, which was built in 1895 and purchased by Taylor's family in 1945, began at 7 a.m. Sunday and the house arrived at its destination about 1:30 p.m.

John Matyiko, owner of Expert House Movers, which was contracted for the move, said the house weighs nearly 370 tons.

"To put it in proportion, we moved the original airport terminal in Newark, New Jersey, and that was 7,000 tons," he told St. Louis Public Radio. "And the tallest building we moved was 21 stories."

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