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Australian man faces $9,000 fine for using drone to deliver a sausage

By
Daniel Uria
The DJI Phantom 3 Professional drone flies at the at the 2016 International CES, a trade show of consumer electronics, in Las Vegas, Nev., January 7, 2016. An Australian drone pilot faces a fine of up to $9,000, as the Civil Aviation Safety Authority is investigating a video of him using a drone to deliver a sausage from a local hardware retail chain to a man in a hot tub. Photo by Molly Riley/UPI
The DJI Phantom 3 Professional drone flies at the at the 2016 International CES, a trade show of consumer electronics, in Las Vegas, Nev., January 7, 2016. An Australian drone pilot faces a fine of up to $9,000, as the Civil Aviation Safety Authority is investigating a video of him using a drone to deliver a sausage from a local hardware retail chain to a man in a hot tub. Photo by Molly Riley/UPI | License Photo

CANBERRA, Australia, Nov. 9 (UPI) -- The Civil Aviation Safety Authority of Australia is investigating a viral video involving a man using a drone to deliver a sausage.

The official CASA YouTube account commented on the YouTube video, which has since been removed, warning of a potential fine of up to $9,000, according to EFTM.

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"We are currently reviewing this video for compliance with Australia's aviation safety regulations," the comment read. "Breaching these laws with illegal drone flights may attract fines ranging between $540-$9,000."

The video featured the drone flying to a local Bunnings hardware retailer to pick up a sausage, which it later flew over a residential are to deliver to a man in a hot tub.

CASA spokesman Peter Gibson told the Sydney Morning Herald the actions in the video breached regulations involving using a drone within approximately 100 feet of people as well as use of a drone outside of the line of sight and over a populous area.

"You can clearly see people walking to and from their cars, you can clearly see people around the sausage sizzle," Gibson said.

The drone pilot, who only identified himself as Tim, said the video was "just a bit of fun" and stated he cropped shots from multiple flights together to make it appear like one continuous trip.

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"[The] drone would [have] lost signal over that distance and would [have] been extremely difficult to control via a screen," he said.

Tim said he asked the employees if they agreed to appear in the video and worked to clear the area for the flight.

A Bunnings spokesperson however said the company did clear the flight and deferred all inquiries to the CASA.

"This is a classic example of a place where you should never fly a drone," Gibson said. "We want to see people have fun with their drones but if you don't respect the rules then you putting people at risk and there are penalties for doing that."

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