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Canadian university looks to ban political correctness

By Daniel Uria
Canadian university looks to ban political correctness
John Harris, founder of the Harris Institute in Toronto, has drafted a new set of rules, effective during the Spring semester, in response to complaints about use of language and topics being discussed in the classroom. Photo by Harris Institute/Facebook

TORONTO, Nov. 12 (UPI) -- As U.S. universities Yale and Missouri deal with internal social justice and free speech issues, a Canadian university is implementing new rules to prevent the stifling of controversial or unpopular opinions.

John Harris, founder of the Harris Institute in Toronto, has drafted a new set of rules, effective for the Spring semester, in response to complaints about use of language and topics being discussed in the classroom.

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Students and faculty will be required to agree and comply to "Rules of Civility," one of which threatens probation and even dismissal, for anyone found to have "shouted down an opposing view."

Harris told Metro News that he and administrators agree that there is no room for avoiding touchy subjects at the university, known for its courses in music production and management.

"We've got courses that talk about hip-hop culture and rap culture and for some people those are sensitive areas in terms of racism, sexism, et cetera," he said. "In the end, the decision to approve the policy was unanimous."

Harris cites backlash against an on-campus speech from punk rock drummer Martin Atkins, who he admittedly described as "outspoken," and a trend of over 290 guest speeches that were cancelled across Europe and North America as signs that political correctness has gone to far.

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"You shouldn't have limits on what can be discussed," he told Metro News. "Its undermining what a lot of people, including me, feel is the essence of post-secondary education."

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