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Bunny Ranch brothel to offer student debt relief

By
Amy R. Connolly
The Bunny Ranch, a legal Nevada brothel, announced a new program to match its workers student loan payments up to the amount they make as a prostitute. Photo by Joseph Conrad/Flickr
The Bunny Ranch, a legal Nevada brothel, announced a new program to match its workers student loan payments up to the amount they make as a prostitute. Photo by Joseph Conrad/Flickr

RENO, Nev., Oct. 9 (UPI) -- Women hoping to make short work of their student loan payments have a new option, thanks to the Bunny Ranch, one of Nevada's many legal brothels.

Dennis Hof, owner of the Bunny Ranch, announced a new program that will match its workers' student loan payments up to the amount they make as prostitutes. Over a 60-day period, the Bunny Ranch will match the payments of women at accredited two and four-year universities, said Hof, who is a eyeing a run for U.S. Senate.

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Hof, whose brothel came into fame in the 2002 HBO documentary "Cathouse," said he devised the idea when he saw an increasing number of his prostitutes trying to pay down education debts quickly.

"I had a University of Michigan cheerleader named Krissy Summers come to The Bunny Ranch a few years ago after she was $40,000 in debt with student loans," he said. "She paid them all off in two months. She even ended up liking the business and staying long enough to fund her graduate studies."

Summers said with her education debt paid off she is completing her doctoral degree and working alongside Nevada brothel lobbyist George Flynt "to assist in promoting the profession that made me so successful in accomplishing my goals."

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"I look forward to obtaining my degree and helping people with their sexual issues," she said on her website. "My passion is to also help young women and underage girls that have been sex trafficked."

About 43 million Americans owe an estimated $1.2 trillion in student loan debt. Of that, about $103 billion is in default. Many graduates owe an average of $30,000 and say they can't afford the high monthly payments. Others have opted not to pay as a form of protest.

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