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1,090,000 fruit pies in eBay auction

LONDON, Oct. 13 (UPI) -- Online bidding for more than 1 million frozen fruit pies sitting in a British warehouse reached $680 Monday with nearly nine days left in the eBay auction.

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Pressplay Ltd., a British company specializing in the sale of surplus goods, said the 1,090,000 fruit pies, which collectively weigh 76 tons, were originally bound for the supermarket chain ASDA but they went to eBay when the order was canceled, the Daily Mail reported.

"This is quite possibly the most bizarre and largest thing we have ever had to sell," said Luke Schonenberger, e-commerce manager for Pressplay. "Most of us think it will make people laugh and it will be a 10-day auction and we're hoping for a bit of a bidding frenzy."

As of Monday evening, there were 47 bidders.

The winning bidder must independently arrange for transporting and storing the pies, the auction says.

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WWI dog tags returned to man's family

SANTA FE, N.M., Oct. 13 (UPI) -- A New Mexico man said he does not know how his father's World War I dog tags ended up at a woman's Texas home, but he is glad to have the items back.

Ken Parmelee of Santa Fe said he received a phone call in March from Jim Walters, a California newspaper editor and Parmelee family genealogist, saying a man named Jim Wood had discovered dog tags belonging to Parmelee's father while cleaning out the Big Spring, Texas, estate of his maiden aunt, the (Santa Fe) New Mexican reported.

Parmelee said Wood sent him the U.S. Army tags, which are imprinted with "Republique Francaise" on one side and Kenneth A. Parmelee's name on the other. The tags also bear the number 773238 and the letters AEF, which stand for Allied Expeditionary Force.

"It was just an amazing thing to think that this thing is 90 years old and that it survived 90 years and somehow came back around to me," Ken Parmelee said.

He said he does not know how the tags wound up in Texas or whether his father had ever met Wood's aunt.

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Traveler on eighth circuit of globe

FAIRBANKS, Alaska, Oct. 13 (UPI) -- Andrzej Sochacki has arrived in Alaska in a 1997 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme with 140,000 miles on it, on what he said is his eighth trip around the world.

Sochacki, 61, has been to 134 countries on five continents, traveling for more than 10 years, the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reported. The car has no snow tires, so his stop in Alaska will be brief.

The retired mechanical engineer started his current trip in Boston Nov. 21, 2008, in a 13-year-old Toyota Landcruiser. After replacing the transmission in Central America, Sochacki traded the Toyota in for the Oldsmobile at his Phoenix home.

Sochacki says he has met Pope John Paul II, the Dalai Lama and the King of Tonga in his travels. He has circled the globe twice by car and motorcycle and once each by plane, sailboat and train.

He said this is his first trip to Alaska.

His budget is $1,000 a month and his funding comes from savings and sponsors, he said. He drives mostly at night to avoid traffic.


Woman arrested for attempted sword attack

JERSEY CITY, N.J., Oct. 13 (UPI) -- New Jersey police said an incident that started with a public urination summons ended with a woman attempting to attack another woman with a samurai sword.

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Jersey City Police Lt. Edgar Martinez said an off-duty officer spotted a man urinating on a tree at about 1 a.m. Sunday and six people emerged from a house where a party was taking place to argue with the officer while he was writing the man a summons, The Jersey Journal, Jersey City, reported.

Investigators said Thanh Huynh, 39, emerged from the party during the argument and attempted to cut one of the women speaking with the officer with a three-foot-long samurai sword. Huynh was arrested and charged with aggravated assault, possession of a weapon for unlawful purposes and unlawful possession of a weapon.

Police said they do not know Huynh's motive for allegedly attacking the other woman.

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