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Jockstrip: The world as we know it

By United Press International

Man arrested for spreading photos of penis

MILWAUKEE, Oct. 27 (UPI) -- A Wisconsin man is in big trouble for photographing his penis, making copies and leaving them on women's windshields in at least four towns.

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Jeffrey John Hein, 40, currently faces 30 charges of lewd and lascivious behavior for disseminating his private business throughout Hartford and West Bend, and police in Germantown and Menomonee Falls told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel he violated their penal codes as well.

Two of the criminal complaints say Hein got his artistic inspiration from a Web site called "I Shot Myself," which advises readers to "pickle yourself in the adrenaline rush of public nudity," the Journal Sentinel said.

Hein allegedly dropped his photos on windshields, pushed them threw open windows and flipped them through cracked sunroofs.

He would then watch for the women's reactions as they found his missive.

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Many women reported the crime to their local police stations, but at least one woman was spotted taking the photo from her car and passing it onto another car at a Wal-Mart parking lot.


Restroom cameras cost lawyer his job

CHICAGO, Oct. 27 (UPI) -- A Chicago-area lawyer secretly videotaped women using the restroom, a female employee of Mangan, Langhenry, Gillen and Lundquist claimed in a lawsuit.

The suit brought Tuesday by the unidentified woman accused Jerald Mangan of hiding two cameras in the law firm's Wheaton, Ill., office -- one in a roll of toilet paper and the other in a basket of potpourri.

The images were sent to Mangan's computer and the office's server.

The Cook County, Ill., suit also names the law firm as a defendant because other employees were not notified when the first camera was discovered in September. The second was found Oct. 11.

"It's shocking any employer would willingly put a camera in a women's restroom," attorney Dennis DeCaro told the Chicago Sun-Times.

The law firm said Mangan, 48, no longer is with the practice that specializes in defending businesses from insurance claims and has offices in Chicago, Joliet, Rockford and Wheaton, Ill.

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Foie gras debate triggers vandalism

CHICAGO, Oct. 27 (UPI) -- Chicago police had no suspects in the vandalism of a French bistro hours after its owner opposed a proposed city ordinance to ban sale of foie gras.

Foie gras is goose or duck liver from birds forcibly fattened by food jammed down feeding pipes. Gourmets consider goose liver a delicacy but animal rights activists say the way it is produced is cruel torture.

Chef Didier Durand, owner of Cyrano's Bistro, said the restaurant was vandalized Tuesday night or early Wednesday after he testified against a citywide ban on the serving and sale of foie gras. Someone broke a window and spread a bloody substance on the door and sidewalk, the Chicago Tribune reported.

Cyrano's sells about 30 orders of foie gras weekly at $15 for a three-ounce portion.

Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley says he isn't sure the City Council should try to tell people what and what not to eat.


Series ticket stubs worth a small fortune

CHICAGO, Oct. 27 (UPI) -- The newest status symbol in the Windy City is a ticket stub from the first two games of the 2005 World Series, with prices ranging from $68 to $150.

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The Chicago Sun-Times says fans leaving Saturday's Game 1 victory by the Chicago White Sox over the Houston Astros were offered as much as $50 for a ticket stub by people who couldn't get into the game at U.S. Cellular Field.

World Series tickets are such a hot commodity in Chicago that the stubs are being sold at online auction sites like eBay.

Tim Herron, owner of Tim's Card Shop, said a stub from Game 2 -- in which Paul Konerko hit the only grand slam home run in series history -- could be worth real money.

Ticket stubs from the 1959 World Series, the last time the Sox appeared in the Fall Classic, were selling for $100 on eBay.

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