Defining Radiation Risk to Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station

Defining Radiation Risk to Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station

In this image, one of the radiation detectors for the Radi-N2 experiment floats in the International Space Station. This device will help researchers explore the radiation risk to humans in space. Neutrons make up a significant part of the radiation exposure in low-Earth orbit but have not been well characterized. Radi-N2, a Canadian Space Agency investigation, uses bubble detectors to better characterize the neutron environment on the space station, helping to define the risk it poses to crew members. This research builds on the Radi-N1 investigation and repeats measurements in the same or equivalent locations aboard the space station. Measuring the average dose in different space station segments supports the development of a radiation protection plan for future missions. During the week of August 17, 2020, crew members retrieved detectors to collect dose measurements. NASA/UPI