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General Motors Discusses Ignition Switch Recall(20 images)

General Motors (GM) CEO Mary Barra testifies during a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on the GM ignition switch recall, on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on April 1, 2014.

From left to right, Laura Christian, Randal Rademaker, and Shannon Wooten, all who had children die in car accidents caused by faulty GM ignition switches attend a press conference on the switch recall on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on April 1, 2014. The faulty switch, which can randomly shutoff a moving automobile, is linked to the death of 12 people and injuries of over 30 more. UPI/Kevin Dietsch
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Rep. Diana Degette, D-Colo., holds a recalled GM ignition switch as she questions General Motors (GM) CEO Mary Barra during a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on the GM ignition switch recall, on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on April 1, 2014. The faulty switch, which can randomly shutoff a moving automobile, is linked to the death of 12 people and injuries of over 30 more. UPI/Kevin Dietsch
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General Motors (GM) CEO Mary Barra is sworn-in prior to testifying during a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on the GM ignition switch recall, on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on April 1, 2014. The faulty switch, which can randomly shutoff a moving automobile, is linked to the death of 12 people and injuries of over 30 more. UPI/Kevin Dietsch
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General Motors (GM) CEO Mary Barra testifies during a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on the GM ignition switch recall, on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on April 1, 2014. The faulty switch, which can randomly shutoff a moving automobile, is linked to the death of 12 people and injuries of over 30 more. UPI/Kevin Dietsch
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