Obama, as seen in China (16 images)

Presidents don't simply belong to the country they're elected in. If popular (or unpopular) enough, their image can reach iconic status even halfway across the world. Case in point, President Barack Obama, whose face pops up in some expected, and highly unexpected, places in China.
Updated: July 15, 2011 at 3:48 PM
share with facebook
share with twitter
share with pinterest
A Chinese shopkeeper shows the latest t-shirt featuring U.S. President Barack Obama as a socialist soldier, in Beijing, September 9, 2010. UPI/Stephen Shaver
License photo | Permalink
A Chinese woman wears a U.S. President Barack Obama face mask at a temple fair in Beijing January 27, 2009. Tens of millions of Chinese around the world celebrate the start of the Lunar New Year, one of the most important traditional holidays. Incense sticks were lit, fireworks were set off and families and friends gathered for meals in Chinese communities to ring in the Year of the Ox. (UPI Photo/Stephen Shaver)
License photo | Permalink
Money wallets and bags featuring U.S. President Barack Obama dressed in the Red Army communist fatigues of China's former helmsman Chairman Mao Zedong are being sold in shops in Beijing, September 14, 2010. "Oba-Mao" t-shirts and accessories are big sellers in Beijing due to Obama's unflagging popularity among many Chinese. UPI/Stephen Shaver
License photo | Permalink
A Chinese news magazine features a front page story on U.S. President Barack Obama and the Republican presidential candidates, on sale at a newsstand in Beijing on July 7, 2011. The U.S. and Chinese economies -- the world's largest and the fastest-growing economy, respectively -- have become inextricably codependent, a relationship neither side views as healthy, but which neither will move to break. UPI/Stephen Shaver
License photo | Permalink
Two Chinese vendors show off their U.S. President Barack Obama commemorative plates on sale at an outdoor market in Beijing April 10, 2009. In China, ObamaÕs victory has attracted particular curiosity because his emergence is such a thoroughly un-Chinese phenomenon. Political prodigies are rare in a nation that grooms top leaders through decades of CommunistParty vetting and pageantry. (UPI Photo/Stephen Shaver)
License photo | Permalink
Chinese news kiosks advertise the front page of a popular, international men's magazine, the Chinese edition of Men's Health, featuring U.S. President Barack Obama as its man of the year on the streets of Beijing on November 11, 2009. UPI/Stephen Shaver
License photo | Permalink
A Chinese traffic warden works in front of a shopping center showing world news, featuring a story on U.S. President Barack Obama, in downtown Beijing on July 15, 2010. Chinese President Hu Jintao last month reaffirmed the importance of developing China-US relations, saying that closer ties contributes to peace, stability and prosperity in the Asia Pacific region and the world. UPI/Stephen Shaver
License photo | Permalink