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CDC: 1 in 5 Americans report 'long COVID' symptoms after COVID-19 infection

CDC: 1 in 5 Americans report 'long COVID' symptoms after COVID-19 infection
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Wednesday shared data showing that one in five Americans who have been infected with COVID-19 have reported symptoms of "long COVID." File Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI | License Photo

June 22 (UPI) -- Nearly one in five Americans who have had COVID-19 have also developed persistent symptoms known as "long COVID," the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Wednesday.

Data from the Household Pulse Survey, a partnership between the CDC, the Census Bureau and other federal agencies, showed that more than 40% of adults in the United States have had COVID-19 and 19% of those have reported still having symptoms of long COVID.

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Long COVID has been defined as "symptoms lasting three or more months after first contracting the virus and that they didn't have prior to their COVID-19 infection."

The data showed that overall one in 13 adults, or 7.5%, have long COVID symptoms, with older adults less likely to experience the symptoms as nearly three times as many adults aged 50-59 currently have long COVID compared to those 80 and older.

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Additionally, 9.4% of women currently have long COVID symptoms compared to 5.5% of men.

Bisexual adults and transgender adults are also more likely to have long COVID symptoms compared to adults of other sexual orientations or gender identities, as 12% of bisexual adults compared to 7% of straight and gay and lesbian adults.

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An estimated 15% of transgender adults have long COVID compared to 5% of cis-gender males and 9% of cis-gender females.

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Nearly 9% of Hispanic adults have long COVID compared to 7.5% of non-Hispanic White adults and 6.8% of non-Hispanic Black adults and more than twice the percentage of non-Hispanic Asian adults at 3.7%.

Kentucky had the highest percentage of adults with long COVID at 12.7%, followed by Alabama 12.1%, Tennessee and South Dakota at 11.6%.

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